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Thread: Question

  1. #1
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    Default Question

    After you guys do all this work to restore these sleds, are they worth anything?

    To each his own, but I had some of these old junks and I was happy to get rid of them (Polaris TX and old Arctic Cat Jags). At the snow shows, they draw very little interest. Vintage rides might be ok, but the season is pretty short, I'd rather be modding and riding modern stuff.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by blkhwkbob View Post
    After you guys do all this work to restore these sleds, are they worth anything?
    Lol! Nope!

    It's definitely a labor of love. The only ones worth any kind of "real" money are either factory race sleds and/or extremely rare sleds. Even those, you generally will have way more into then you could ever get back out of them....but then, I can also say the same thing about my modern sleds!

    The vintage world is all about the nostalgia, the fun of the hunt for parts, the satisfaction gained by wreching a pile of rust back into something ridable, preserving a piece of history, etc,etc. Is it a waste of money? Sure, but what isn't in the snowmobile world?
    Last edited by snoluver1; 04-25-2017 at 08:41 PM.

  3. #3

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    I think the early 70's EXT cats and SRX yamahas are worth some bucks. The other mass production sleds, not so much.

  4. #4
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    There are plenty of vintage sleds worth very good money if they are in good condition. just need to kno which ones to look for. race sleds usually being the most valuable

  5. #5
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    Like they say, "one man's trash is another man's treasure". I don't have the aptitude nor the patience to bring these machines back to life. Come to think of it I don't have the room either. But what I do have is a lot of respect for the guys that turn these machines around from a pile of rusty parts to a polished piece of history. Keep up the good work fellas!

  6. #6
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    A limited build dealer only sled like the Chap that Skiroule just bought might be worth a lot someday. Like 40 years after he is dead. A good example of a valuable oldie would be a 1976 John Deere Liquidater. There were only 600 of these built to begin with. They were purpose built to race in the Winnipeg to St Paul cross country race. Which they did win. After that a lot of the race sleds were crushed. Nobody knows how many remain but when they do come up for sale they go for some pretty good ching. A complete one in good condition sold for over $10000 in Winnipeg last year. Parts are impossible to find for them as they were one ofs. They have very little in common with anything else John Deere ever built. By the way if anybody knows where a perfect one is that is for sale let me know. I will give you $500 finder's fee.

  7. #7
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  8. #8
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    If any one finds mach 1 X or MX X or plus X PRS chassis doo's, they bring a premium, especially the 1992 mach 1 X with the 670 and twin pipes and original engine. big money. also the 1993 mach Z with original 93 engine, almost impossible to find.

    post-1789-1248740007.jpg1993machz11.jpg
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    Last edited by momoney2123; 04-26-2017 at 12:40 PM.

  9. #9
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    there really only worth anything to the guy building them and MAYBE a few like minded folks, but, you will never really get back what you sink into them, pending HOW re done or mod'd up you go,
    some classic models will , or seem to have more loyal followings, big triples for example, still catch some folks eye's and guys use the motors for many things even now.
    but they will always be older sleds, and NOT what modern sleds are for overall ride and performance,
    can only make something better, without totally altering things, and few do that to classic's or older sleds , due to NO point really
    I have a older T cat, just all re done, sank way more into it than I know its worth to anyone BUT me, so, I kinda know this area LOL

    as I said, its one of them things, when you start a project and HAVE a budget, you tend to ALWAYS go over that budget and at that point, its NOT about making the $$ back, its about having what you want !
    Which tends to mean its NOT what others want or will pay for , or pay what you sank into it!

  10. #10
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    Pretty funny! I wonder if he does a "wrench drop" when he's done??

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrbb View Post
    there really only worth anything to the guy building them and MAYBE a few like minded folks, but, you will never really get back what you sink into them, pending HOW re done or mod'd up you go,
    some classic models will , or seem to have more loyal followings, big triples for example, still catch some folks eye's and guys use the motors for many things even now.
    but they will always be older sleds, and NOT what modern sleds are for overall ride and performance,
    can only make something better, without totally altering things, and few do that to classic's or older sleds , due to NO point really
    I have a older T cat, just all re done, sank way more into it than I know its worth to anyone BUT me, so, I kinda know this area LOL

    as I said, its one of them things, when you start a project and HAVE a budget, you tend to ALWAYS go over that budget and at that point, its NOT about making the $$ back, its about having what you want !
    Which tends to mean its NOT what others want or will pay for , or pay what you sank into it!
    There are still rumblings from the Pol direction of a new 2 stroke triple. It is said to be mounted in a new frame that does not have as much travel as the current offerings. So maybe what is old will be new again. Your old TCat will probably go as fast or faster than a new TCat just because it doesn't have all those sharp suspension angles which also take extra power to overcome. I have my old ZR 900s which I still like for the tight twisties in NW Wisc. It is my opinion that you don't need a foot of travel on both ends if the trails are smooth. That is just me - I know I will get shot down here. Also the old ZR 900s will go an honest 110 GPS. So now I have ordered a new Sidewinder that will go 120 on GPS but is 120 lbs heavier than the ZR and will require more work to ram through the tight stuff at speed. Also it will suck more fuel than the ZR. There are two kinds of vintage sleds. Old relics like the Chap Skiroule is fixing up. He is doing it for sentimental reasons and it is a rare sled. He will probably never come out on it but that is not why he is doing it. Other vintage sleds are sleds like your TCat and my old ZRs that still do have some useful benefits out on the trails. TCats still have a tremendous following. I know of a guy that has 15 of them. And there are still tons of ZRs and XCs out on the trails. And they still get the job done. They are not a new 'Doo. They are not rider forward. They are not all shiny and new. But they still get the job done.

  12. #12
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    The vintage snowmobile craze is the fastest growing segment of the entire snowmobile sport. As for these relics values, they keep increasing if you have the right machine. Generally speaking, Arctic Cat King Cats & EXT's, Polaris Starfires, Rupp Magnums & Nitros, Yamaha SR & SRX, SkiDoo TNT to name a few. Mostly muscle sleds if you will bring the most cash. I have a collection that I don't have a lot invested but they're worth quite a bit to sell indivually. All muscle sleds in the 1970's.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by grub View Post
    There are still rumblings from the Pol direction of a new 2 stroke triple. It is said to be mounted in a new frame that does not have as much travel as the current offerings. So maybe what is old will be new again. Your old TCat will probably go as fast or faster than a new TCat just because it doesn't have all those sharp suspension angles which also take extra power to overcome. I have my old ZR 900s which I still like for the tight twisties in NW Wisc. It is my opinion that you don't need a foot of travel on both ends if the trails are smooth. That is just me - I know I will get shot down here. Also the old ZR 900s will go an honest 110 GPS. So now I have ordered a new Sidewinder that will go 120 on GPS but is 120 lbs heavier than the ZR and will require more work to ram through the tight stuff at speed. Also it will suck more fuel than the ZR. There are two kinds of vintage sleds. Old relics like the Chap Skiroule is fixing up. He is doing it for sentimental reasons and it is a rare sled. He will probably never come out on it but that is not why he is doing it. Other vintage sleds are sleds like your TCat and my old ZRs that still do have some useful benefits out on the trails. TCats still have a tremendous following. I know of a guy that has 15 of them. And there are still tons of ZRs and XCs out on the trails. And they still get the job done. They are not a new 'Doo. They are not rider forward. They are not all shiny and new. But they still get the job done.
    I fully agree some of the older sleds are still FAST, but only on smooth trails LOL
    where honestly, they run just fine, but the problem with older sleds is, as soon as you get a mogul in a SMOOTH trail, you KNOW IT! and can get in over your head if there are a LOT of them you didn;t see coming
    there are some mods you can do to older sleds to get you more travel and suspension, like on my T cat, I have a cross fire 136 skid in it and a AGLT front end with gets me about 13 inches up front and a good travel in rear,
    but its where you sit on them that still kills you in bumps,
    I tell folks its like a tetter totter effect on old sleds ,where you sit too far off of center, so ALL bumps you get, at felt and amplified like, due to tail kick you get on an older sled

    where as newer sled you sit more in the middle of tings and as such, you get the least amount of kick from bumps, , even if BOTH sleds had NO shocks, the newer sleds just by where you sit are WAY better in ride, add in the taller seating to help you stand as needed with less effort, and you can see real fast HOW they are SO much better overall in ride.
    I DON"T think there any better in 0-60, or 0-100, look back at old shoot out results and you'll see there still pretty even there, to be honest!
    even HP numbers are not far off on older 600 or 800 motors

    But motors like sitting position, have come a ways on being more effortless
    200 miles on a older sled VS a new one, and you will see how huge things are even on SMOOTH as glass trails, and so will your wallet on fuel used

    I ran My T cat this past winter with guys on new sleds, and I was stopping for fuel abut 2 times to there one on ever trip/loop we did! and we were NOT riding hard or fast, they were getting maybe 12-13 mpg and I was getting about 9, and I was running MAYBE 1/4 throttle if that to be honest!, granted at times there were bursts of FUN added LOL
    which is where a BIG hp sled shines to be honest, 0-100 come fast and pulls the arms


    I think there will always be followers again to the big triples, and I sure would LOVE to see one in a new chassis, they cannot weight any more than a big 4 stroke motor, to be honest!

    I did mine up, as part of sentimental value, as I owned a bunch in my younger days when they came out and always wanted another one in great condition
    sadly, I had mine re done in summer of 2016 and in early 2017, totaled it, and NOW< have it all done again, picking it up tomorrow to be honest LOL

    her's a pic, of before crash and of it done again!(the 800 is a friend of mine's) I do have a 600 also though!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
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    Well as others have mentioned, the older sleds are cheap to ride. Many of us grew up riding the 340cc sleds, 440cc was big back in the 1970's. Sure the speeds were slower because of the suspension, or lack of, but we didnt care we just wanted to get outside (or maybe some of you can relate to this) "you kids better go outside and play or your mom will find something for you to do"!!!

    I admit I am an "old car guy", so having "old sleds" just seems normal to me and sometimes a slow leisurely ride through the woods with other vintage sleds is like a car show in motion.
    As i mentioned in another thread the cost of riding the old sleds is minimal compared to the newer stuff as well. No trail permits, registrations that never expire, etc. just for having a old sled registered with the special "vintage snowmobile registration" that is available here in Michigan.
    I also have three modern sleds, so I still pay to play and will continue to do so.
    Somedays we just dont have enough snow for my liking on my modern sleds, but many vintage sleds wont suffer any ill effects on these low snow days.
    I only have so many more winters to get out and make memories, so in these low snow winters, a vintage sled can get you out for a ride......... and you dont wear out skis, hyfax, carbides etc... I feel the new ones cost too much to ride on snirty trails, and my 2" lug track eats hyfax for breakfast and lunch if the conditions are poor.

    and if anyone is watching, vintage racing is getting bigger every year, both oval and drag racing. And that is just to win some plastic trophy and a maybe a jacket or more oil to do it again next year

    Kirk600
    Last edited by kirk600; 04-27-2017 at 09:58 PM. Reason: Spelling

  15. #15
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    I suppose everyone has their own definition of ďworth anythingĒ so Itís kind of a tough question to answer. My feeling is yes, a restored sled can have considerable value (certainly more than it sold for new) but turning a profit is an entirely different matter. On most of mine that Iíve done varying degrees of restoration I think I would get my investment back (assuming free labor) but not a penny more. Of course, Iíd have to actually sell something to confirm that.

    So why mess around with this ďold junkĒ then? The guys have posted a lot of great reasons on this thread but in the end I guess itís a hobby like any other hobby. For me, just going out and starting a couple just to hear them run makes my day better.

    Kirk600 made an excellent point about also owning late model sleds. I personally donít know any vintage guys that donít also ride late models. I have a Switchback Assault that I love to take out in the backwoods and see how fast I can get it stuck but it seems like Iím spending more and more time on the old iron when it comes to trail riding. Over the last three winters Iíve actually put more trail miles on the vintage stuff than the Assault.

  16. #16
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    I figure guys do the vintage stuff for memories.

    As someone said, there are no smart money decisions ever made when it comes to snowmobiling.

  17. #17
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    Its all a labor of love for me. My passion are the vintage (late 70s) smaller CC sleds. We have several. I do it to watch our grandkid's faces light up when they pull in the drive and see the sleds out in the yard. Though I help maintain the local trails, we haven't ridden our late model sleds on the trails in several years.

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